Seafood Cooking | Seafood

Always marinate seafood in the refrigerator.

A general rule for cooking fish is 10 minutes per inch of thickness at 400 F to 450 F, turning the fish halfway through the cooking time. This rule does not apply to frying or microwave cooking.

Fish less than 1/2-inch thick do not have to be turned.

If fish is cooked in a sauce or foil, add 5 additional minutes to the cooking time.
The cooking time for frozen fish should be doubled. We recommend that you thaw fish prior to cooking.Fish is done when the flesh becomes opaque and flakes easily at the thickest part.

BROILING
Place fish, one-inch thick or less, 2-4 inches from the source of heat. Thicker pieces
should be placed 5-6 inches away from the heat.
GRILLING
Preheat gas or electric grill.
Charcoal grill: start the fire about 30 minutes before cooking. When coals are white-hot, spread out in a single layer. Adjust the grill height to 4 to 6 inches above the heat. Fish is best grilled over a moderately hot fire and on a grid that has been well oiled. Use indirect heat for a whole fish.
FRYING - PAN-FRY - SAUTE:
Fry fillets in 1/8-inch of oil - or enough to come in contact with one side of fish - for 3 to 6 minutes per side or until golden and fish flakes easily.
Thickness of fillets will determine the cooking time.
DEEP FRY:
Place fish in single layer in deep kettle or saucepan and cook in enough fat to cover and permit it to move freely - do not crowd. The proper temperature in most instances is 365 F. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes or until golden brown. When cooking multiple batches always allow the temperature of the oil to return to 365 F before adding fish.
NOTE:
Scallops and shrimp become opaque and firm when fully cooked.

To “boil” shrimp - place them in a large pot of boiling water (4 cups of water/pound of shrimp); and simmer 3-5 minutes.
Steam shrimp 3-5 minutes.

Scallops should be broiled for 3-5 minutes.

Oysters and clams
Steam or broil until the shell pops open
Fry in oil for 3-4 minutes at 375 F
Bake for 10 minutes at 450 F.

There is a risk with consuming raw oysters. If you have chronic illness of the liver, stomach or blood, or have immune disorders, you are at greater risk of serious illness from eating raw oysters and should eat fully cooked oysters. If unsure of your risk, consult a physician.

TEL: 954.983.6831 - 4191 North State Road 7 Hollywood, FL 33021 - Email